Baxter Lake, located in the Township of Georgian Bay, District of Muskoka is located less than two hours north of Toronto. This quiet lake at the top end of Gloucester Pool has very little boat traffic, but it provides water-access to Little Go Home Bay, Trent-Severn Waterway and Gloucester Pool. All the cottages on Baxter Lake have road-access, with a few exceptions on the islands. The area contains many types of flora and fauna, and many different species including black bear, deer, moose, fox, raccoon, beaver, martin, chipmunks, swans, hummingbirds, loons, blue heron, ducks, salamanders, and numerous types of freshwater fish.

Cedar Point is located in the Township of Tiny, County of Simcoe, a small community located on the northerly point of Southern Georgian Bay shore, a few minutes outside of Lafontaine and about 20 minutes from Penetanguishene by car. The ferry runs between Christian Island, a First Nations reserve, and the mainland. Cedar Point has a general store, which also serves as the local post office. The area has a number of seasonal and year-round waterfront properties.

Christian Island (Beausoleil First Nation) rests in the southern tip of Georgian Bay on Christian, Beckwith and Hope Islands. These magnificent islands are home to the Chippewa people, and are rich with history. A species of grass, nicknamed ‘Ice-Age Grass,’ currently on the Species at Risk list, is found throughout Christian Island. Home to about 700 residents year-round, with many more during the summer, tourism is abundant. First Nation Land cannot be purchased, but there are many leased properties with waterfront cottages that can be purchased. Purchase includes all the improvements (cottage, docks, sheds, etc.) on the property, as well as the right to take over the land-lease. The island is accessed by ferry that runs between Cedar Point on the mainland, and the southern tip of Christian Island. Vehicles are also ferried to the island, where all the properties are drive-to by road.

Cognashene (Georgian Bay), located in the Township of Georgian Bay, District of Muskoka, is a water-based community on the east shore of Georgian Bay just north of Honey Harbour, with hundreds of seasonal and some year-round cottages with boat-access from Honey Harbour. The active Cottage Owners Association in Cognashene is mandated to represent and coordinate the communal interests of its membership, assist in the preservation and protection of the area known as Cognashene and beyond, ensure ongoing enjoyment of the Bay, and build a strong sense of community. Membership is open to both permanent residents and seasonal guests.

Cognashene Lake (Georgian Bay) and Point Conservation Reserves, located in the Township of Georgian Bay, District of Muskoka, comprise 2945 hectares of ecologically sensitive wetlands along Georgian Bay. Access to this remote area is by water, through Georgian Bay or Go Home Lake. The Missasauga Rattlesnake lives in the rock barrens. Cognashene Lake has a very popular cottage community, with dozens of cottages along its shore. There are no roads, and the area can only be accessed by boat from Honey Harbour, about a 20 minute boat ride.

Coldwater is located in Severn Township, Simcoe County, on the Coldwater River just southeast of Matchedash Bay (Georgian Bay) on Highway #12, approximately 20 minutes from Orillia and 30 minutes from Barrie. Although the town itself has only a few waterfront properties along the river, it provides a gateway to a vast area of lakes and rivers that include Maclean Lake, Severn River, Big Chute and Georgian Bay. The community features several shops, lumber yards, liquor stores, banks and restaurants, as well as a dry-land marina and a power sport equipment distributorship.

Farlain Lake is located in Tiny Township, Simcoe County, just a few kilometers north of Penetanguishene. This is a popular lake traditionally surrounded by small cottages, many of which have recently been renovated or replaced with much larger, year-round residential homes. The lake is approximately 3 kilometers long and a half-kilometer wide. The Awenda Provincial Park, with its miles of spectacular public beaches, envelopes the east, north and half of the west sides of the greater lake area.

Galla Lake is located in Georgian Bay Township, District of Muskoka, and is less than a one-hour drive north of the city of Barrie, and less than two hours north of Highways #407 and #400. It’s a very private lake with only 34 cottages. Fifty-percent of its shorefront is Crown Land. There are several good year-round trails around the lake that connect it to other nearby lakes. All of the cottages on this lake have road-access. Easy access to the OFSC Trail system make this a popular winter destination. The area contains many different types of flora and fauna, and is home to several different species including black bear, deer, moose, fox, raccoon, beaver, martin, chipmunks, swans, hummingbirds, loons, blue heron, ducks, salamanders, and numerous types of freshwater fish.

Often described as the ‘Sixth Great Lake,’ Georgian Bay lies halfway between Toronto and Sault Ste. Marie, and is bordered by the districts of Manitoulin, Sudbury, Parry Sound and Muskoka as well as the County‚ of Simcoe, Grey and Bruce. It is separated from Lake Huron by Manitoulin Island and the Bruce Peninsula, and is nearly a big as Lake Ontario. It features 2,000 kilometers of shoreline, with more than 30,000 islands, beginning at Beausoleil Island, which is part of the Georgian Bay Islands National Park. Majestic towering cliffs, endless beaches and clear blue water make this a one-of-a-kind destination with a rich marine heritage, noted for the picturesque lighthouses that dot the coast. An array of smooth, sandy beaches distinguish the south shore. The bay is a popular spot for anglers and boaters. Pike, pickerel, muskie and salmon abound within its clear waters.

Gibson Lake is located in Georgian Bay Township, District of Muskoka, 45 minutes north of the city of Barrie, and is accessed by Highway #400 interchange #174. The land-locked lake is 7 kilometers long, and flows into Georgian Bay via the Gibson River. The lake comprises two sections, with the narrows connecting the north and south ends. The southern areas of the lake are popular with cottagers. The north-east side is dominated by the Sahanatien Native Mohawk reserve, which has seen much development in recent years. Many of the cottages on the north-east side are built on land leased from Wahta Mohawk families, and are accessed by privately maintained roads. While this is First Nation Land which cannot be purchased, many leased properties with waterfront cottages can be purchased. The purchase of a cottage includes all the improvements (cottage, docks, sheds, etc.) on the property, as well as the right to take over the land-lease. Gibson Lake contains a small island where a yearly picnic festival and regatta occur during the first weekend of August. The area contains many different types of flora and fauna, and a variety of species such as black bear, deer, moose, fox, raccoon, beaver, martin, chipmunks, swans, hummingbirds, loons, blue heron, ducks, salamanders, and numerous types of freshwater fish. It is also a cranberry-growing region.

The Gloucester Pool boating area begins at Lock 45 in Port Severn, runs north-east through Little Lake, and carries on through Little Chute to the Big Chute Marine Railway, one of only two operating marine-railways in the world. The boundary between the District of Muskoka and Simcoe County runs down the centre of Gloucester pool and has the Township of Georgian Bay on the north and Severn Township on the south. It provides direct access to Little Go Home Bay, Baxter Lake, Little Lake and Maclean Lake. Cottagers can enjoy boating, water-skiing, wake-boarding, wake-skating, tubing, canoeing, kayaking and picnicking. The lake is 13 kilometers long and is home to at least 20 islands. Little Lake is separated from Gloucester Pool by a channel called the Narrows. The Pool is the last major body of water on the Trent-Severn Waterway before Georgian Bay. Most of the cottages around Gloucester Pool have road-access, but properties on several of the islands are boat-access only. The area contains many different types of flora and fauna, with different species including black bear, deer, moose, fox, raccoon, beaver, martin, chipmunks, swans, hummingbirds, loons, blue heron, ducks, salamanders, and numerous types of freshwater fish.

Go Home Bay (Georgian Bay) is a 25-minute boat ride north of Honey Harbour, in the Township of Georgian Bay, District of Muskoka, with a boat-access community that has existed for more than a century. Originally, the community had its own school, library, store and post office where the mail ship, Penetang 88, stopped often as it made its way along Georgian Bay serving water-based communities. Cottaging in the Go Home Bay area began at the turn of the century when The Madawaska Club, associated with the University of Toronto, was formed with the purpose of combining scientific research with recreation. The name was chosen because the members hoped to also acquire land along the Madawaska River south of Algonquin Park. Early activities focused around a clubhouse and research station but, over the next few decades, members spread out and built private cottages, many of which still exist in their original form. For nearly a century, cottaging in the Go Home Bay area was restricted to people associated with the University of Toronto under the terms of the original Charter, but that restriction is gone, and now all cottagers from The Hangdog to Indian Harbour are welcome to join The Madawaska Club. Many of the area cottagers are also shareholders in The Madawaska Club Limited, which owns over 1600-acres of undeveloped land in the Go Home Bay area. The Go Home Slide, at the eastern end of Go Home Bay, was named for a log-slide once used to float logs down from Go Home Lake (just to the east) into Georgian Bay. The log-slide is long gone, but the series of natural waterfalls cascading down from Go Home Lake to Georgian Bay make this a fabulous destination for an afternoon swim and picnic. Access to Go Home Bay is either by boat from Honey Harbour, 25 minutes to the south, from Kings Bay, 20 minutes to the north, or by portaging the Go Home Slide from Go Home Lake.

Go Home Lake, one of the most beautiful lakes in Muskoka, has much to offer. Located in Georgian Bay Township, District of Muskoka, only 45 minutes north of the city of Barrie and 100 minutes north of Highways #407 and #400, it features incredible waterfalls where the Musquash River flows into the lake. A water-level-control dam at its south end guarantees a consistent water level throughout the year. The constant water-flow ensures that the water quality is maintained. A high percentage of the lake is Crown Land, with many natural sites to explore. Another natural waterfall at the Go Home Bay Slide is a very popular picnic and swimming location. Members of the Voyageur’s Club have unlimited use of a truck and trailer, allowing for easy movement of boats between Go Home Lake and Georgian Bay, with unlimited boating potential. This is predominantly a boat-access lake, where only a small number of cottages enjoy road-access. The area contains many different types of flora and fauna, and is home to many different species including black bear, deer, moose, fox, raccoon, beaver, martin, chipmunks, swans, hummingbirds, loons, blue heron, ducks, salamanders, and numerous types of freshwater fish. Winter activity is very popular on this lake, with easy access to the OFSC Trail system.

Honey Harbour, is a beautiful paradise found at the southern end of Georgian Bay, in Georgian Bay Township, District of Muskoka, approximately a 90-minute drive from Toronto, and a ten-minute drive off Highway #400 at Port Severn. It’s surrounded by sparkling blue water, and dotted with islands and channels to explore by boat. This area has hundreds of both boat-access and drive-to cottages. Honey Harbour is a thriving town with many year-round residents and several resorts, including the popular Delawana Inn. The many bays, channels and islands that comprise the Honey Harbour area make exploring by boat very interesting as well as time-consuming, with hundreds of miles of shoreline to explore. Winter is also a very active time, especially for snowmobilers, since many of the OFSC Trails converge nearby. Ice fishing is also a popular pastime. Many of the contractors in the area work right through the winter, building and renovating cottages, so their owners have more time during the summer months to enjoy them. Georgian Bay Islands National Park (Beausoleil Island), a beautiful park with miles of hiking trails and several boat-access camping sites, is just a short taxi-boat ride away.

Kings Bay (Georgian Bay), in Georgian Bay Township, District of Muskoka, is a small protected bay just south of Twelve Mile Bay. It provides a gateway to a vast area of boat-access cottages including Wah-Wa-Tay-See, Moose (Freeman) Bay, Indian Harbour, Monument Channel and Go Home Bay. Privately-owned Tadenac Lake is immediately to its south-east, and is home to a popular fishing camp with caretakers who have lived there in relative isolation for many years. Miners Creek, directly off of Georgian Bay, provides access to Tadenac.

Little Lake is located in the heart of Midland, Simcoe County, and has a mix of cottages, year-round residences, and a large mobile home community that covers much of the south-eastern shore. It’s a smaller round-shaped lake, approximately 1.7 kilometers long, with mostly untouched shoreline. Little Lake Park covers the entire north-eastern lake-shore, and dates back to the founding of the town in the 19th century, when it was a popular destination for tourists arriving on the Midland Railway. But its history predates even the arrival of Europeans. In the 17th century, it was the site of a native Ouendat village, which has been recreated in an adjacent historical museum, and of Ontarajia,a Ouendat Ossuary or burial ground. Today, the large park includes two play areas, a multiple court beach volleyball area, the Midland Rowing Club and an arboretum.

Maclean (Black Lake) is located in Severn Township, Simcoe County, south-east of Port Severn, only 80 minutes north of Toronto. It’s connected to the Trent-Severn Waterway and Gloucester Pool, and is home to many road-access cottages, as well as some year-round residents. Hundreds of birds, including loons and blue heron, as well as mammals of all sizes, populate the area.

Midland is situated at the southern end of Georgian Bay‚Äôs 30,000 Islands, in Simcoe County, and is the economic centre of the region, with a 125-bed hospital and an airport. It is the main town of the southern Georgian Bay area. In summer, its population expands to over 100,000 with seasonal guests arriving at more than 8,000 cottages, resort hotels, provincial and national parks in the surrounding municipalities. Located 90 minutes north of Toronto, Midland offers an engaging blend of culture, history, recreation and nature. Visitors, lured by the sandy beaches, established nature areas, and fine array of shopping, dining and entertainment opportunities, can also discover the Huronia Museum and Huron/Ouendat Village, which offers a glimpse into the aboriginal history of the region, and Castle Villiage, one of southern Ontario’s most unique theme parks. Midland offers a host of outdoor activities – boating, golfing and fishing in the summer, and cross-country skiing and snowmobiling in the winter, making this an excellent year-round destination. The community is a friendly, charming gateway to the picturesque 30,000 Islands. Several local and provincial museums depict the rich and colourful history of the area reflecting the regions three founding cultures. Historical attractions include a reconstructed 17th-century Jesuit mission, a 19th-century British military base, and Canada’s first reconstructed pre-European-contact aboriginal village. Connect with nature and explore the outdoors at your leisure or with an interpreter at the local wildlife centre. Enjoy the natural blend of breathtaking landscapes on a cruise of Georgian Bay. Take part in many of the season recreation opportunities available or join the fun at local events and festivals.

Orr Lake is located in the Township of Springwater, Simcoe County, about half-way between Barrie and Midland on Highway #93, approximately 20 minutes north of Barrie, and a bit more than an hour drive from North Toronto. Orr Lake is a quiet circular lake with very little boat traffic. The lakeshore is home to many seasonal and year-round residents. Its calm water makes this a favourite for water-skiing. Ice fishing and snowmobiling are also very popular. The community contains a general store as well as a popular golf course.

Penetanguishene, sometimes shortened to Penetang, is in Simcoe County. Incorporated in 1882, this bilingual community has a population of nearly 10,000. Its name is derived from Ojibwa, and means ‘place of the white rolling sands.’ It’s located 90 minutes north of Toronto on the south-east shore of Georgian Bay. Penetanguishene is a departure point for the Georgian Bay 30,000 Islands daily boat tours aboard the Georgian Queen. North of Penetanguishene, the Awenda Provincial Park offers fantastic hiking trails and stunning beaches, with more than 300 camp sites. Recreational activities in the park include canoeing, swimming and cross-country skiing.

Port McNicoll is located in the Township of Tay, Simcoe County, on the south-east shore of Georgian Bay, just off provincial Highway #12, approximately 90 minutes from Toronto, and 35 minutes from Orillia. This small historic village is currently under re-development by Skyline Port McNicoll Development Inc., with plans for an 825-acre four-season master-planned resort community, which will contain many waterfront year-round residences, condominiums, a marina, shops, and a large hotel. Deep-water slips will be available, with great boating opportunity throughout the 30,000 Islands of Georgian Bay. There are also hundreds of year-round and seasonal waterfront cottages in the area.

Port Severn is located in both Severn and Georgian Bay Townships, Simcoe County and District of Muskoka respectively, and is also known as the Gateway to Georgian Bay, 90 minutes north of Toronto. This area is rich both in history and landscape. Port Severn is home to the last Lock 45 of the Trent-Severn Waterway system. To the east of Port Severn is Little Lake, part of Gloucester Pool and the Trent-Severn Waterway, and to the west is Georgian Bay. Cottagers enjoy activities like boating, water-skiing, wake-boarding, wake-skating, tubing, canoeing, kayaking and picnicking. There are many year-round waterfront properties in the four-season resort town, and several resorts catering to many different interests. Winter activities include ice fishing and snowmobiling, and the OFSC Trail goes directly through the centre of the town. The popular ski resort of Mount St. Louis/Moonstone is fifteen minutes to the south. A brand-new development to the west, Oak Bay, currently under construction, will contain nearly 500 residential units, some of them on or near the water, a marina, an 18-hole golf course, and a country club. There is another golf course ten minutes south of Port Severn in the community of Cold Water.

Sawlog and Kettles Bay are located on the most northerly point of the Southern Georgian Bay shoreline, in the Township of Tiny, County of Simcoe, about a 15-minute drive north of Penetanguishene. The area has many seasonal and year-round cottages and homes, many of which have spectacular views across Georgian Bay towards Christian, Beckwith and Hope Islands, as well as Giants Tomb and Cognashene. The sunsets in this area are phenomenal. Adjacent to Kettles Beach is the popular Awenda Provincial Park, with miles of spectacular beaches open to the public with a small park entrance fee.

The Severn River (Trent-Severn Waterway), with its headwaters at the north end of Lake Couchiching, flows north-west to Georgian Bay, passing through Sparrow Lake, Gloucester Pool and Little Lake at Port Severn, with access to Tea Lake, Maclean Lake, Baxter Lake and Little Go Home Bay. The Severn River forms the boundary between the District of Muskoka and the County of Simcoe. The Big Chute Marine Railway, one of only two operating marine-railways in the world, is located where the river flows into Gloucester Pool, and provides access below the Severn River. The river has hundreds of both boat-access and drive-to cottages along its banks, and in the many bays along its path. The Trent-Severn Waterway is a very popular boating destination for visitors from all over North America. A boat can travel from Georgian Bay to Lake Simcoe in less than a day. The Waterway is open to through-traffic from early May to late October, but the sections between the locks can be used any time with no restrictions.

Six Mile Lake is located in Georgian Bay Township, District of Muskoka, only 45 minutes north of the city of Barrie, and 90 minutes north of Highways #407 and #400, with several access points from Highway #400. The majority of the cottages on the lake are road-access and four-seasonal. It features Whites Falls, where Six Mile Lake flows into Gloucester Pool, and a water-level-control dam that guarantees a constant water-level throughout the year. The constant water-flow in and out of the lake ensures that water quality is maintained. Many of the cottages on Six Mile have road-access but a number of the islands have only boat-access. The area contains many different types of flora and fauna, and many different species including black bear, deer, moose, fox, raccoon, beaver, martin, chipmunks, swans, hummingbirds, loons, blue heron, ducks, salamanders, and numerous types of freshwater fish. Winter activity is popular on this lake, with easy access to the OFSC Trail system.

Tea Lake is in Severn Township, Simcoe County, less than a 2-hour drive north from Toronto, and is connected to the Trent-Severn Waterway above Big Chute. This quiet lake has very little boat traffic, and there’s road-access to all the cottages. Home to hundreds of birds, including loons and blue heron, and mammals of all sizes, the area teems with wildlife, and adventurers can enjoy hiking trails, lakes and waterways.

Twelve Mile Bay (Georgian Bay), located in Georgian Bay Township, District of Muskoka, only a two-hour drive from Toronto, is a narrow natural inlet on the eastern shore of Georgian Bay near the town of MacTier, 27 kilometers north of Port Severn. It features wind-swept rocks, and many islands and sandy coves. The O’Donnell Point Nature Reserve is located on the south shore of the bay, forming an 875-hectare peninsula. The reserve has been identified as a protected area and is home to over 235 plant species and 83 species of birds. Most of the cottages around Twelve Mile Bay are accessible by road, with boat-access-only properties on the western end. Twelve Mile Bay is the gateway to a vast area of boat-access cottages that include San Souci, Iron City, Port Lawson, Woods Bay and Manitou.

Thunder Beach is located in the Township of Tiny, County of Simcoe, in the Southern Georgian Bay region, about a 15 minute drive north of Penetanguishene. Enjoy magnificent sunsets across Georgian Bay, with a combination of sandy and rocky shoreline, and stunning views of Christian, Hope and Beckwith Islands, and Giants Tomb. This area is home to many prestigious waterfront homes and cottages, some of which sell for multiple millions. Smaller seasonal properties are gradually being bought and torn down to make way for larger year-round dwellings. Just to the east is the popular Awenda Provincial Park, with miles of spectacular beaches open to the public.

Victoria Harbour is located in Tay Township, Simcoe County, on the south-east shore of Georgian Bay, just off provincial Highway #12, and is about 90 minutes from Toronto, and 30 minutes from Orillia. A small town community with sophisticated shore development, Victoria Harbour has many seasonal and year-round waterfront cottages and homes, some of which enjoy a west-to-north-west exposure with lots of afternoon sun and beautiful sunsets. The beaches are generally sandy with a few pebbly areas. Methodist Island is a 5-minute boat ride north, where there are several boat-access cottages and vacant lots available. Queens Cove is a large marina facility located downtown, home to many large boats and yachts.

Waubaushene is located in Tay Township, Simcoe County, on the south-east shore of Georgian Bay, just off the crossroads of Provincial Highways #12 and #400, 90 minutes north of Toronto. This small community is known as the Gateway to Georgian Bay, with many seasonal and year-round waterfront cottages and homes, most of which enjoy a west-to-north-west exposure with lots of afternoon sun and striking sunsets. The beaches are generally sandy, with some pebbled areas.